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BF109 G02:36

BF109 G

Due to the Messerschmitt Bf 109's versatility and time in service with both the Luftwaffe and other foreign air forces, numerous variants were produced over the eight years of service with the Luftwaffe and even more were produced by its foreign users.

Bf 109 E-4Edit

Messerschmitt Bf-109E01:07

Messerschmitt Bf-109E

Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-4
BF109E4
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Bayerische Flugzeugwerke
Produced In January 1940 - ?
Speed 560 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 2 x 20 mm MG FF (120 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 17 (1000 rounds)
Bombs 1x 250 kg
Historical Picture
Bf 109E-4real

In late 1938, the Bf 109 "Emil"-serie entered production. To improve on the performance afforded by the rather small 447-522 kW (600-700 hp) Jumo, the larger Daimler-Benz DB 601A engine was used, yielding an extra 223 kW (300 hp) at the cost of an additional 181 kg (400 lb). To test the new 1,100 PS (1,085 hp, 809 kW) DB601A engine, two more prototypes (V14 and V15) were built, each differing in their armament. While the V14 was armed with two 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17s above the engine and one 20 mm MG FF in each wing, the V15 was fitted with the two MG 17s mounted above the engine only. After test fights the V14 was considered more promising and a pre-production batch of 10 E-0 was ordered. Batches of both E-1 and E-3 variants were shipped to Spain for evaluation, and received their baptism of fire in the final phases of the Spanish Civil War. The E-3 was replaced by the E-4 (with many airframes being upgraded to E-4 standards starting at the beginning of the Battle of Britain) which was different in some small details, most notably by using the modified 20 mm MG-FF/Mwingcannon and having improved head armor for the pilot. With the MG FF/M it was possible to fire a new and improved type of explosive shell, called Minengeschoß (or 'mine-shell') which was made using drawn steel (the same way brass cartridges are made) instead of being cast as was the usual practice. This resulted in a shell with a thin but strong wall, which had a larger cavity in which to pack a much larger explosive charge than was otherwise possible. The new shell required modifications to the MG FF's mechanism due to the different recoil characteristics, hence the MG FF/M designation. The cockpit canopy was also revised to an easier-to-produce, "squared-off" design, which also helped improve the pilot's field of view. This canopy, which was also retrofitted to many E-1s and E-3s, was largely unchanged until the introduction of a welded, heavy-framed canopy on the G series in the autumn of 1942. The E-4 would be the basis for all further Bf 109E developments. Some E-4 and later models received a further improved 1,175 PS (1,159 hp, 864 kW) DB601N high-altitude engine; known as the E-4/N this first appeared in July 1940. The E-4 was also available as a fighter-bomber with equipment very similar to the previous E-1/B. It was known as E-4/B (DB 601Aa engine) and E-4/BN (DB 601N engine). A total of 561 of all E-4 versions were built, including 250 E-4, 20 E-4/N, 211 E-4/B and 15 E-4/BN.

Bf 109 F-4Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 F-4
BF109F4
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In May 1941 - May 1942
Speed 635 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 17 (1000 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109f4real

Development of the airframe for the Bf 109 "Friederich"-serie had begun in 1939. After February 1940 an improved engine, the Daimler-Benz DB 601E, was developed for use with the Bf 109. The engineers at the Messerschmitt facilities took two Bf 109 E-1 airframes and installed this new powerplant. The first two prototypes, V21 (Werksnummer (Works number) or W.Nr 5602) and V22 (W.Nr 1800) kept the trapeziform wing shape from the E-1, but the span was reduced by 61 cm (2 ft) by "clipping" the tips. Otherwise the wings incorporated the cooling system modifications described below. V22 also became the testbed for the pre-production DB 601E. The smaller wings had a detrimental effect on the handling so V23, Stammkennzeichen (factory Code[Notes 1]) CE+BP, W.Nr 5603, was fitted with new, semi-elliptical wingtips. The fourth prototype, V24 VK+AB, W.Nr 5604, flew with the clipped wings but featured a modified, "elbow"-shaped supercharger air-intake which was eventually adopted for production, and a deeper oil cooler bath beneath the cowling.[33] On all of these prototypes the fuselage was cleaned up and the engine cowling modified to improve aerodynamics.

As the DB601E was not yet available in numbers, the pre-production F-0 (the only F variant to have a rectangular supercharger intake) and the first production series F-1/F-2 received the 1,175 PS (1,159 hp, 864 kW) DB 601N engine driving a VDM 9-11207 propeller. The F-0/F-1 and F-2 only differed in their armament; the F-1 being fitted with one 20 mm MG FF/M Motorkanone firing through the engine hub, with 60 rounds. The F-1 first saw action in the Battle of Britain in October 1940 with JG 51. The most experienced fighter aces like Werner Mölders were the first ones to fly the first Bf 109 F-1s in combat in October 1940. A total of 208 F-1s were built between August 1940 and February 1941 by Messerschmitt Regensburg and the Wiener Neustädter Flugzeugwerke. The F-2 introduced the 15 mm Mauser MG 151 cannon with 200 rounds. The Motorkanone was supplemented by two synchronized 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17 machine guns mounted under the engine cowl, with 500 rpg. As the harder-hitting 20 mm version of the same gun become available, a number of F-2s were retrofitted with it in the field. About 1,380 F-2s were built between October 1940 and August 1941 by AGO, Arado, Erla, Messerschmitt Regensburg and WNF. No tropicalized version was built, although individual F-2s were retrofitted with sand filters in the field. The maximum speed of the F-1 and F-2 was 615 km/h (382 mph) at rated altitude.

The 1,350 PS (1,332 hp, 993 kW) DB 601E was used in the F-3 and F-4model together with a VDM 9-12010 propeller with broader blades for improved altitude performance. The DB 601 E was initially restricted to 1,200 PS (1,184 hp, 883 kW) at 2,500 rpm; however, the full rating of 1,350 PS at 2,500 rpm was cleared for service use by February 1942. The DB 601 E was able to use 87 octane "B-4" aviation fuel, despite its increased performance; while the earlier DB 601N ran on 100 octane designated as "C-3" by the Luftwaffe. Only 15 examples of the F-3 are believed to have been produced by Messerschmitt Regesnburg between October 1940 and January 1941. Like the F-1, the F-3 was armed with the 20 mm MG-FF/M and two 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17s. From the F-4 onward, the new 20 mm Mauser MG 151/20 with 200 rounds was used as the motorkanone. The first F-4s reached frontline units in June 1941. Production lasted exactly a year between May 1941 and May 1942, with 1,841 of all F-4 variants produced. Some of the later models were capable of mounting two 20 mm MG 151/20 cannons under the wing in faired gondolas with 135 rpg. These were designated F-4/R1 and 240 of them were produced by W.N.F. in the first quarter of 1942. This optional additional armament was standardized as field kit for later G and K series. A special high-altitude variant, the F-4/Z featuring GM-1 boost, was also built with a production run of 544 in the first quarter of 1942 and saw extensive use. Finally, the Erla factory produced 576 tropicalized F-4 trop in the first half of 1942.

Bf 109 F-4/BEdit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 F-4/B
No image
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In May 1941 - May 1942
Speed 624 km/h
Category Fighter Bomber
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 17 (1000 rounds)
Bombs 1 x 250 kg
Historical Picture
Bf-109f4breal


Bf.109F-4 / B differed from F4 only in the mechanism of bomber and ventral holder per 250 kg bomb.

Bf 109 G-2Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2
BF109G2
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In May 1942 - ?
Speed 621 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 17 (1000 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g2real

The Bf 109 Gustav-series was developed from the largely identical F-series airframe, although there were detail differences. Modifications included a reinforced wing structure, an internal bullet-proof windscreen, the use of heavier, welded framing for the cockpit transparencies, and additional light-alloy armour for the fuel tank. It was originally intended that the wheel wells would incorporate small doors to cover the outer portion of the wheels when retracted. To incorporate these the outer wheel bays were squared off. Two small inlet scoops for additional cooling of the spark plugs were added on both sides of the forward engine cowlings. A less obvious difference was the omission of the boundary layer bypass outlets, which had been a feature of the F-series, on the upper radiator flaps. Like most German aircraft produced in World War II, the Bf 109 G-series was designed to adapt to different operational tasks with greater versatility; larger modifications to fulfil a specific mission task like long-range recon or long-range fighter-bomber were with "Rüststand" and given a "/R" suffix, smaller modifications on the production line or during overhaul like equipment changes were made with kits of pre-packaged parts known as Umrüst-Bausätze, usually contracted to Umbau and given a "/U" suffix. Field kits known as Rüstsätze were also available but those did not change the aircraft designation. Special high-altitude interceptors with GM-1 nitrous oxide injection high-altitude boost and pressurized cockpits were also produced. The newly fitted Daimler-Benz DB 605A engine was a development of the DB 601E engine utilised by the preceding Bf 109F-4; displacement and compression ratio were increased as well as other detail improvements. Takeoff and emergency power of 1,475 PS (1,455 hp, 1,085 kW) was achieved with 1.42 atm of boost at 2,800 rpm. The DB605 suffered from reliability problems during the first year of operation, and this output was initially banned by VT-Anw.Nr.2206, forcing Luftwaffe units to limit maximum power output to 1,310 PS (1,292 hp, 964 kW) at 2,600 rpm and 1.3 atm manifold pressure. The full output was not reinstated until 8 June 1943 when Daimler-Benz issued a technical directive. Up to 1944, the G-series was powered by the 1,475 PS Daimler-Benz DB 605 driving a three-blade VDM 9-12087A variable-pitch propeller with a diameter of 3 m (9.8 ft) with even broader blades than used on the F-series. Pitch control, as on the 109F, was either "electro-mechanical"" (automatic) or "manual-electric" using a thumb-switch on the throttle lever. From 1944 a new high-altitude propeller with broader blades was introduced, designated VDM 9-12159, and was fitted to high-altitude variants with the DB 605AS or D-series engines. The early versions of the Bf 109G closely resembled the Bf 109 F-4 and carried the same basic armament; however, as the basic airframe was modified to keep pace with different operational requirements, the basically clean design began to change. From the spring of 1943, the G-series saw the appearance of bulges in the cowling when the 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17 were replaced with 13 mm (.51 in) MG 131 machine guns (G-5 onwards) due to the latter's much larger breechblock, and on the wings (due to larger tyres), leading to the Bf 109 G-6's nickname "Die Beule" ("The Bulge"). The Bf 109G continued to be improved: new clear-view cockpits, greater firepower in the form of the 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 108 cannon were introduced in late 1943; and a new, enlarged supercharger for the DB605, a larger vertical stabilizer (G-5 onwards), and MW 50 power boost in 1944. Erich Hartmann, the World's top scoring fighter ace, claiming 352 victories, flew only the Bf 109G, of which he said: It was very manoeuvrable, and it was easy to handle. It speeded up very fast, if you dived a little. And in the acrobatics manoeuver, you could spin with the 109, and go very easy out of the spin. The only problems occurred during takeoff. It had a strong engine, and a small, narrow-tread undercarriage. If you took off too fast it would turn ninety degrees away. We lost a lot of pilots in takeoffs. From the Bf 109 G-5 on an enlarged wooden tail unit (identifiable by a taller vertical stabilizer and rudder with a morticed balance tab, rather than the angled shape) was often fitted. This tail unit was standardised on G-10s and K-4s. Although the enlarged tail unit improved handling, especially on the ground, it weighed more than the standard metal tail unit and required that a counterweight was fitted in the nose, increasing the variant's overall weight. With the Bf 109G, a number of special versions were introduced to cope with special mission profiles. Here, long-range fighter-reconnaissance and high-altitude interceptors can be mentioned. The former were capable of carrying two 300 L (80 US gal) drop tanks, one under each wing; and the latter received pressurized cockpits for pilot comfort and GM-1 nitrous oxide "boost" for high altitudes. The latter system, when engaged, was capable of increasing engine output by 223 kW (300 hp) above the rated altitude to increase high-altitude performance.

The G-1, produced from February 1942, was the first of the G-series. This was the first production Bf 109 with a pressurized cockpit and could be identified by the small, horn-shaped air intake for the cockpit compressor just above the supercharger intake, on the left upper cowling. In addition, the angled armour plate for the pilot's head was replaced by a vertical piece which sealed-off the rear of the side-hinged cockpit canopy. Small, triangular armour-glass panels were fitted into the upper corners of this armour, although there were aircraft in which the plate was solid steel. Silica gel capsules were placed in each pane of the windscreen and opening canopy to absorb any moisture which may have been trapped in the double glazing. The last 80 G-1s built were lightweight G-1/R2. In these GM-1 nitrous oxide 'boost' was used, and the pilot's back armour was removed, as were all fittings for the long-range drop tank. A few G-1 flown by I./JG 1 are known to have carried the underwing 20 mm MG 151/20 cannon gondolas.

The G-2, which started production in May 1942, lacked the cabin pressurization and GM-1 installation. Performance-wise it was identical to the G-1. The canopy reverted to one layer of glazing and incorporated the angled head armour used on the F-4, although several G-2 had the vertical type as fitted to the G-1. Several Rüstsätze could be fitted, although installing these did not change the designation of the aircraft. Instead the "/R" suffix referred to the G-2's Rüstzustand or equipment condition of the airframe, which was assigned at the factory rather than in the field. There were two Rüstzustand planned for G-2s:

  • G-2/R1: had one 300 L (80 US gal) drop tank beneath each wing, plus an ETC bomb rack under the fuselage, capable of carrying a 500 kg (1,100 lb) bomb and an auxiliary undercarriage unit beneath the fuselage. Also could carry a large jettisonable tail wheel, just aft of the cockpit.
  • G-2/R2: a reconnaissance aircraft with GM-1 and camera equipment.

The rack and internal fuel lines for carrying a 300 L (80 US gal) drop-tank were widely used on G-2s, as were the underwing 20 mm MG 151/20 cannon gondolas. Several G-2s were fitted with the ETC 500 bomb rack, capable of carrying one 250 kg (550 lb) bomb. The final G-2 production batches built by Erla and Messerschmitt Regensburg were equipped as tropical aircraft (often referred to as G-2 trop), equipped with a sand-filter on the front of the supercharger intake and two small, teardrop-shaped metal brackets on the left side of the fuselage, below the cockpit sill. These were used as mounts for specially designed sun umbrellas (called Sonderwerkzeug or Special tool), which were used to shade the cockpit. A total of 167 G-1s were built between February and June 1942, 1,586 G-2s between May 1942 and February 1943, and one further G-2 was built in Győr, Hungary, in 1943. Maximum speed of the G-2 was 537 km/h (334 mph) at sea level and 660 km/h (410 mph) at 7,000 m (22,970 ft) rated altitude with the initial reduced 1.3 atm rating. Performance of the G-1 was similar, but above rated altitude the GM-1 system it was equipped with could be used to provide an additional 350 horsepower. With his G-1/R2, pilot R. Klein achieved 660 km/h (420 mph) at 12,000 m (39,370 ft), and a ceiling of 13,800 m (45,275 ft).

Bf 109 G-2/R6Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2/R6
BF109G2R6
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In May 1942 - ?
Speed 621 km/h
Category Heavy Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 3 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 17 (1000 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g2r6real

Only the experimental I-185 fighter could compete with the Bf 109G-2 in rate of climb and only the MiG-3 could reach a service ceiling of 11,250 meters (the best series-produced examples could climb to 11,500 m). The Messerschmitt salvo weight was 4.67 kilograms per second.32 Underwing cannon considerabh reduced the horizontal maneuverability of the aircraft, which we called the "five-pointer". The German designation was Bf 109G-2/R6. It took the German fighter 22.6 seconds to complete a bank at an altitude of 1000 meters (similar to the series-produced La-5) and most Soviet fighters could perform a run-in from the rear during the second or third bank.

Bf 109 G-6Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6
BF109G6
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In February 1943 - 1944
Speed 623 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g6real

In February 1943, the G-6 was introduced with the 13 mm (.51 in) MG 131s, replacing the smaller 7.92 mm (.312 in) MG 17 – externally this resulted in two sizeable Beule blisters over the gun breeches, reducing speed by 9 km/h (6 mph). Over 12,000 examples were built well into 1944 although contradictory factory and RLM records do not allow an exact tally. The G-5 with a pressurized cockpit was identical to the G-6. A total of 475 examples were built between May 1943 and August 1944. The G-5/AS was equipped with a DB 605AS engine for high-altitude missions. GM-1-boosted G-5 and G-6 variants received the additional designation of "/U2" and were clearly identifyable as they use a modified, aerodynamically cleaner, engine cowl without the usual blisters.

One offensive weapons upgrade in 1943 for the Bf 109G was one that mounted the Army`s Werfer-Granate 21 rocket weapon system with one launching tube under each wing panel. The rockets, fitted with a massive 40,8 kg (90 lbs) warhead, were aimed via the standard Revi reflector sights, and were spin-stabilized in flight. In emergency, the tubes could be jettisoned via a small explosive charge. Intended as a "stand-off" weapon, fired from a distance of 1,200 meters and outside the effective range of the formations defensive guns, it was employed against Allied bomber formations, the Wfr. Gr. 21 rocket was unofficially known as the BR 21 (Bordrakete 21 cm) for the Bf 109G-5, G-6 and G-14. The weapons system received the designation of Rüstsatz VII on the G-10.

Bf 109 G-6/R6Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6/R6
BF109G6R6
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Produced In 1944
Speed 623 km/h
Category Heavy Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g6r6real

Entering production in the autumn of 1942: the Beule (Bump) Bf-109G-6 remained one of the Luftwaffe's work-horses for the remainder of the war. The Bf-109G-6/R6variant was a interceptor (Zerstӧrer) designed to attack heavy bomber aircraft such as the B-17 and B-24. To fit it for such a role, the aircraft carried an additional pair of MG 151/20 cannon under its wings.

Bf 109 G-6/U5Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6/U5
BF109G6U5
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt A.G.
Produced In Autumnm 1942 - ?
Speed 623 km/h
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Guns 1 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (70 rounds)
2 x 30 mm MK 108 (200 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g6u5real


Beginning in 1944 it recieved a new tailfin and larger rudder. Other versions of the Bf-109G-6 included the G-6/R-2 fitted with RB-50/30 camaras, G-6/R-3 fitted with RB-75/30 camaras, G-6 Trop, G-6/U2 with GM-1 Boost, G-6/U3 with MW50, G-6/U4 with 30mm MK 108 cannon, G-6/U4N which was a night fighter varient fitted with the Naxos FuG 350 radar detection system, G-6/U5with MG-151/20 Cannon, G-6Y with FuG 16ZY whip antenna, and G-6AS with a DB-605AS engine with a bigger turbo charger for high alltitude use.

Bf 109 G-10Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-10
BF109G10
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 685 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 1 x 30 mm MK 108 (67 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g10real


During the course of 1943, a number of improvements were gradually introduced. In an attempt to increase the pilot's field of view an armoured glass head-rest, the so-called Galland Panzerwas developed, and subsequently began replacing the bulky armour plate in the spring of 1943. Towards the end of the year the clear-view Erla Haube canopy appeared, named after one of the sub-contractors involved in building the Bf 109. Often mis-named the "Galland Hood" in postwar Western aviation books and periodicals, it eventually replaced the older heavily framed two-piece canopy on the Bf 109G. The canopy structure was completely redesigned to incorporate a greater area of clear perspex; the welded framing was reduced to a minimum and there was no longer a fixed rear portion, with the entire structure aft of the windscreen being hinged to swing to starboard when opened. The Bf 109 G-10, AS-engined G-5s, G-6s and G-14s as well as the K-4 saw a refinement of the engine cowlings. The blisters which had formerly covered the spent shell-casing chutes of the MG 131s became more streamlined and were lengthened and enlarged to cover both the weapons and the engine bearers. Initial prototype versions were symmetrical, but as larger superchargers were fitted, the engines required modified upper engine bearers to clear the supercharger housing, and as a result the final shape of the new cowling was asymmetrical, being enlarged on the port side where the supercharger was mounted on the DB engine. There were also special streamlined panels fitted to the forward fuselage. These so-called agglomerations could be seen in several different patterns. Because of their aerodynamically more efficient form in a side-view of DB 605AS and D -powered Bf 109 Gs and Ks, the agglomerations were barely discernible compared with the conspicuous fairings they replaced


Bf 109 G-10/R4Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-10/R4
No image
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 685 km/h
Category Heavy Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 3 x 30 mm MK 108 (67 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
300px

Bf 109G-10/R4 with DB 605D engine had a pair of 30-mm MK 108 cannon in underwing gondolas.

Bf 109 G-10/R6Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-10/R6
BF109G10R6
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 685 km/h
Category Heavy Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 2 x 15 mm MG 151/20 (70 rounds)
1 x 30 mm MK 108 (67 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
Bf-109g10r6real


The Bf 109 G-10/R6 was similar to the R4, but with the gondolas housing 20mm MG 151s.

Bf 109 K-6Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 K-6
BF109K6
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 685 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Crew in‑game 1
Guns 3 x 30 mm MK 108 (67 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
300px

The Bf 109 "Kurfürst"-serie was the last of the series to see operational duty and the last in the Bf 109 evolutionary line. The K series was a response to the bewildering array of series, models, modification kits and factory conversions for the Bf 109, which made production and maintenance complicated and costly – something Germany could ill-afford late in the war. The RLM ordered Messerschmitt to rationalise production of the Bf 109, consolidating parts, types, and so on, to produce a uniform, standard model with better interchangeability of parts and equipment. At the same time, the existing flaws of the design were to be remedied. Work on the new version began in the spring of 1943, and the prototype was ready by the autumn of that year. Series production started in August 1944 with the K-4 model, due to changes in the design and delays with the new DB 605D powerplant. The K-4 was the only version to be mass-produced.  Externally the K series could be identified by changes in the locations of the radio equipment hatch, which was moved forward and to a higher position between frames four and five, and the filler point for the fuselage fuel tank, which was moved forward to a location between frames two and three. In addition, the D/F loop was moved aft to sit between frames three and four on the top fuselage spine and a small circular plate above the footstep on the port side of the fuselage was deleted. The rudder was fitted as standard with a Flettner tab and two fixed tabs although some rare examples were not fitted with the fixed tabs. All K-4s were to be fitted with a long retractable tailwheel (350 × 135 mm/14 × 5 in) with two small clamshell doors covering the recess when the tail-wheel was retracted. The wings featured the large rectangular fairings for the large 660 × 190 mm (26 × 7 in) main wheels. Small wheel well doors, originally planned for the G series, were fitted to the outer ends of the wheel bays, covering the outer wheels when retracted. These doors were often removed by front-line units. The ailerons were fitted with small, adjustable trim tabs. The radio equipment was the FuG 16ZY with an antenna mast fitted under the port outer wing and FuG 25a IFF as well as the FuG 125 Hermine D/F equipment. Internally, the oxygen bottles were relocated from the rear fuselage to the right wing. Flettner tabs for the ailerons were also to be fitted to serial production aircraft to reduce control forces, but are only seen on photos of later production aircraft. Main task of B-109 K-6 was to intercept bombers, for which he carried two 30-mm MK 103 underwing pods, however, fuselage gun MG 151 was later replaced by a 13-mm MG 131 . Deliveries of Bf 109K-6 fighter group began in January 1945, but there came only a few of these machines before the collapse of the Third Reich. However, considering that its take-off weight - 3600 kg was making it for as poorly managed, that it really was bliss for Luftwaffe pilots in full Allied air supremacy.

Bf 109 K-8Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 K-8
BF109K8
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 680 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Guns 1 x 30 mm MK 103 (60 rounds)
3 x 30 mm MK 108 (120 rounds)
Historical Picture
300px

The Bf-109K-8 was a reconnaissance fighter version of the Bf-109 K-6, with a camera in the rear fuselage and no cowling guns, the troughs for the barrels being faired over. Project drawings of the K-8 show an K-series airframe powered by the two-stage DB 605L high altitude engine, a high-velocity 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 103mot Motorkanone, and two 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 108 cannons in the wings; the cowl 13 mm (.51 in) MG 131s were dispensed with.

Bf 109 K-10Edit

Messerschmitt Bf 109 K-10
BF109K10
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Designer Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser
Manufacturer Messerschmitt
Speed 680 km/h
Category Fighter
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Guns 1 x 30 mm MK 103(60 rounds)
2 x 30 mm MK 108 (50 rounds)
2 x 7.92 mm MG 131 (600 rounds)
Historical Picture
300px

The K-10 was very similar to K-6, with the MK 108 cannon in the engine replaced by the Mk 103. The war ended before this aircraft could enter service.

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